January 2019

SOUTHEASTERN

https://jaredragland.com/southeastern

Download:
Ragland-Research Statement.pdf
Ragland-Teaching Philosophy and Diversity Statement.pdf
Ragland-Vita.pdf

Portfolio of creative activity and student work is below. Further examples of personal work, research outcomes, and studio news are linked here on the website menu.


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CREATIVE ACTIVITY

 

Michael, 8, from the series Good Bad People: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment print, 16x24”
Michael is the son of meth users. The first time Michael’s mother, Misty, used meth she went on a five day binge. On the fifth day she woke up to find her oldest son drowning in the bathtub. The boy was resuscitated, but soon after he and two other children were taken from Misty’s care. Michael is the only child who remained in her custody. Today, Michael and his mother no longer live on Sand Mountain; Misty is drug-free and her oldest son was just accepted into the University of Alabama.




Legal, 21, from the series Good Bad People: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment print, 16x24”
Legal is a target for the local police and is arrested regularly.




Willow, 37, from the series Good Bad People: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment print, 16x24”
Willow tries to inject but struggles to find a vein, sticking herself half a dozen times before blaming me for making her nervous with the camera. Willow is a chronic binge user who lived in more than six homes in less than nine months.




Ryan, 22, from the series Good Bad People: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment print, 16x24”
Upon his release from jail Ryan walked more than 20 miles from the sheriff’s office to his parent’s house in a neighboring county. He had served three months for stealing from friends, family and strangers to support his meth habit. While in jail he found Jesus, became a born again Christian and swore off meth, but he was turned away by his father when he arrived back home. After reuniting with his ex-girlfriend, Alice, he moved into a trailer with her and began using again, this time with needles. Ryan recently moved away from Sand Mountain and is living drug-free.




Selections from the series Good Bad People: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment prints, 16x24” each




Selections from the series Good Bad People: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment prints, 16x24” each
 



Mono, 40, from the series Good Bad People: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment print, 16x24”
Mono arranges clothes for a garage sale. Together with another user, he sold just enough to buy a quarter gram of meth, hardly enough to split and both get high. “Meth makes me forget about my problems, it makes me not think about them. Look, I might use and all that, but… I’m one of the good bad people. I’m a good, bad person. That’s what I tell everybody.”
 



Trailer for the short documentary film, SOME MILLION MILES, 2019
Co-directed with Adam Forrester, 12 minutes
To view the full film via PBS online: https://www.pbs.org/video/some-million-miles-zlgpox/  




Bessemer Mounds (VisionLand), Jefferson County, Alabama, from the series Where You Come From is Gone, 2017–
Archival pigment print from wet-plate collodion tintype, 40x50”
Collaboration with Cary Norton
The Bessemer Mounds were first occupied during the Late Woodland Period between 800-1000AD. While the mounds are approximately 400 years older than those found 75 miles southeast at the historically-preserved Moundville Archeological Park, historians believe there was a relationship between the mound builders. The mounds at Bessemer were leveled sometime in the 1900’s; a water sewage plant and VisionLand, a defunct theme park, are now located on the site.
 



Cahaba River, Dallas County, Alabama, from the series Where You Come From is Gone, 2017–
Archival pigment print from wet-plate collodion tintype, 40x50”
Collaboration with Cary Norton
For millennia people have been drawn to the land situated at the confluence of the Cahaba and Alabama rivers. It was first occupied by large populations of Paleoindians; then from 1000-1500 the Mississippian period brought agriculture and mound builders. A walled city with palisades greeted Spanish explorers before western disease killed thousands in the 16th and 17th centuries. The remaining native peoples coalesced into four tribal nations–Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek–but were wiped out and forced to move by greater influx of Europeans. By the 19th century the dirt from the ancient mounds at Cahawba was used to build railroad beds, and the town became the first, yet quickly failed, capital of Alabama. A few short years later buildings and homes were taken down brick by brick and used to build Selma, home to further injustice.




Garrett Cemetery, Cherokee County, Alabama, from the series Where You Come From is Gone, 2017–
Archival pigment print from wet-plate collodion tintype, 40x50”
Collaboration with Cary Norton
Outside the gates of the Garrett Cemetery is the final resting place of Pathkiller, the last full-blooded hereditary chief of the Cherokee. During the American Revolution Pathkiller allied himself with the British and fought against American troops, but by 1813 he had sided with Andrew Jackson’s militia in the Creek Wars. Just three years after Pathkiller’s death, Jackson forced the Cherokee from their ancestral homelands.




Selections from the series Where the Train Goes Slow, 2018
Archival pigment prints, 16x24” each
 



Selections from an untitled series documenting H-2A visa migrant workers topping tobacco, Wilson County, NC, 2018
Commissioned by the Wilson County Agricultural Center / NC Cooperative Extension
Archival pigment prints, 16x24” each




Selections from Shift//, 2016
Engineering prints, 24x36” each
Crowd-sourced photographs mapping geographic space between the Birmingham Museum of Art and the BMA’s temporary SHIFT space, compiled during an April 2016 residency in collaboration with Birmingham photographers Rob Culpepper, Jenny Fine, Wes Frazer, Timothy Harstvedt, Devin Lunsford, C.W. Newell, Cary Norton, Carolyn Sherer, Orlando Thompson, and Leita Turner,
 



Selections from the series Everything Is Going To Be All Right, 2015
Archival pigment prints, 28x32, 16x20, 11x14”




Selections from the series Everything Is Going To Be All Right, 2015
Archival pigment prints, 28x32” each




Installation views of Everything Is Going To Be All Right, 2015
Candela Books + Gallery, May 2017 (left, top right); Convergys Gallery, Art Academy Cincinnati, December 2015 (bottom right)
 



Selections from the book, And light followed the flight of sound, 2018
30 foot-long hand-bound accordion book with saddle-stitched zine and mylar slip cover, featuring images by 52 photographers made on the 2017 total solar eclipse. Coordinated, edited, and bound in collaboration with Eliot Dudik as One Day Projects. Edition of 150
 



Selections from the book, Or Give Me Death, 2016
Photographed, edited, designed and published in 24 hours at Candela Books + Gallery, Richmond, Va. Edition of 100
Collaboration with Eliot Dudik as One Day Projects
 



Book and installation of Or Give Me Death, 2016
Photographed, edited, designed and published in 24 hours during Candela Books + Gallery’s Indie PhotoBook Showcase, Richmond, Va. Edition of 100
Collaboration with Eliot Dudik as One Day Projects


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STUDENT WORK



Aaron Canipe, selections from the series Plateau
Pigment prints, 20x24” each
MFA Thesis Project
Duke University • Master of Fine Arts in Experimental & Documentary Arts Graduate Thesis Committee • 2015
aaroncanipe.com




Documentation of the student curated exhibition, Inherited Scars: A Meditation on the Southern Gothic
Birmingham Museum of Art, April 2 – August 9, 2015
https://www.artsbma.org/exhibition/inherited-scars-a-meditation-on-the-southern-gothic/
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Photography in the South • 2015




Brittney Truitt, selections from the series Highway 31
Pigment prints, 24x30” each
BFA Thesis Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • BFA Exhibition • 2015




Devin Lunsford, selections from the series Waiting for Something That’s Not Coming
Pigment prints, 6x6” each
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Photography in the South • 2015
devinlunsford.com




Christianna Traynor, selections from the series Marshall County
Pigment prints, 6x9” each
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Photography in the South • 2015




Aubrey Venkler, selections from the series Lines and Boundaries
Archival pigment prints, 16x20” each
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Neighborhood Studies • 2018




Evan Franklin, selections from the series 41st St N
Archival pigment prints, 12x16” each
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Neighborhood Studies • 2018




Macy J. Moon, selections from Day 5 - November 27, 2018, from the series Walking Archive
Digital images published to online archive website, https://macyjanemoon.cargo.site/Walking-Archive-About
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Neighborhood Studies • 2018




Selection of student artist books and zines accessioned into the Birmingham Museum of Art Hanson Library Artist Book Collection
https://uab.edu/news/self-published-artist-books-and-zines-made-by-uab-students-now-part-of-birmingham-museum-of-art-collection
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Camera-less • 2016




Daniel Senko, selections from the artist book, Taking Portraits
Rephotographed photobook dust jacket portraits, various sizes
Course Final Zine Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Camera-less • 2016




Jacob Lawley
Google street view screen capture typology
Mapping Assignment
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Camera-less • 2016




Devin Lunsford, selections from the series, Done Lost Too Much
Pigment prints documenting recovering methamphetamine cooks, made in collaboration with UAB Department of Criminology student Natalie Matos, 16x24” each
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Stories from the Line – Documenting Poverty • 2015
devinlunsford.com




Cole Martin
Silver gelatin prints, 6x6” each
Self-portrait Assignment
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Experiential Photography • 2017




Megan Hammonds
Toned silver gelatin prints, various sizes
Sequencing and Narrative Assignment
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Intermediate Photography • 2015




Eric Gregory Powell, selections from the series Route 1
Pigment prints, 16x20” each
BFA Thesis Project
Corcoran School of the Arts + Design, George Washington University • Studio Photojournalism Core IV Senior Thesis • 2007




Jessica Kolscielniak, selections from the series Weighted Decisions
Pigment prints, 16x24” each
BFA Thesis Project
Corcoran School of the Arts + Design, George Washington University • Studio Photojournalism Core IV Senior Thesis • 2007
jessicakoscielniak.com




Sara J. Winston, selections from the series Chronicles
C-prints, 8x8” each
Sequencing and Narrative Assignment
Corcoran School of the Arts + Design, George Washington University • Studio Fine Art Photography Core III • 2010
sarajwinston.com




John Edmonds, Male Studies
C-prints, 10x10” each
Corcoran School of the Arts + Design, George Washington University • Studio Fine Art Photography Core III • 2010
johnedmonds.studio




Justine Tobiasz, selections from the series Strike, Gently
Gum bichromate prints with blood, 16x20” each
Sequencing and Narrative Assignment
Corcoran School of the Arts + Design, George Washington University • Studio Fine Art Photography Core III • 2008
justinetobiasz.info




William Knipscher, installation view of The Children
Artist-made beeswax and charcoal crayon rubbing from photo-polymer plates in handmade wood frames, 48x60” each
BFA Thesis Project
Corcoran School of the Arts + Design, George Washington University • Studio Fine Art Photography Core IV Senior Thesis • 2009
williamknipscher.com


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