January 2021

ARKANSAS STATE

https://jaredragland.com/arkansasstate

Portfolio of creative activity and student work is below. Further examples of personal work, research outcomes, and studio news are linked here on the website menu.


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CREATIVE ACTIVITY

 

Michael, 8, from the series Hellbender: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment print, 16x24”

Michael is the son of meth users. The first time Michael’s mother, Misty, used meth she went on a five day binge. On the fifth day she woke up to find her oldest son drowning in the bathtub. The boy was resuscitated, but soon after he and two other children were taken from Misty’s care. Michael is the only child who remained in her custody. Today, Michael and his mother no longer live on Sand Mountain; Misty is drug-free and her oldest son was just accepted into the University of Alabama.




Willow, 38, from the series Hellbender: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment print, 16x24”
Willow tries to inject but struggles to find a vein, sticking herself half a dozen times before blaming me for making her nervous with the camera. Willow is a chronic binge user who lived in more than six homes in less than nine months.




Ryan, 22, from the series Hellbender: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment print, 16x24”
Upon his release from jail Ryan walked more than 20 miles from the sheriff’s office to his parent’s house in a neighboring county. He had served three months for stealing from friends, family and strangers to support his meth habit. While in jail he found Jesus, became a born again Christian and swore off meth, but he was turned away by his father when he arrived back home. After reuniting with his ex-girlfriend, Alice, he moved into a trailer with her and began using again, this time with needles. Ryan recently moved away from Sand Mountain and is living drug-free.




Mono, 40, from the series Hellbender: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment print, 16x24”
Mono arranges clothes for a garage sale. Together with another user, he sold just enough to buy a quarter gram of meth, hardly enough to split and both get high. “Meth makes me forget about my problems, it makes me not think about them. Look, I might use and all that, but… I’m one of the good bad people. I’m a good, bad person. That’s what I tell everybody.”




Selections from the series Hellbender: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment prints, 16x24” each




Selections from the series Hellbender: Methamphetamine Use on Sand Mountain, Marshall County, Alabama, 2015-2019
Archival pigment prints, 16x24” each




Trailer for the short documentary film, SOME MILLION MILES, 2019
Co-directed with Adam Forrester, 12 minutes
To view the full film via PBS online: https://www.pbs.org/video/some-million-miles-zlgpox/  




Egmont Key, Florida, from the series Where You Come From is Gone, 2017–
Archival pigment print from wet-plate collodion tintype, 40x50”
Collaboration with Cary Norton
The US government began forcibly removing Native Americans from Florida in 1817. As Eastern Woodland peoples throughout the southeast were forced to leave their homelands and walk to Oklahoma, the Seminoles – an already displaced people – were removed by steamship in an over-water branch of the Trail of Tears. One such vessel, the Grey Cloud, made more than two dozen voyages during the Second and Third Seminole Wars from a stockade on Egmont Key, a small spit of an island located in the mouth of Tampa Bay. At one time, the stockade held as many as 300 Seminoles, including Holata Micco (Billy Bowlegs), the last Seminole chief in South Florida; Emateloye (Polly Parker), who escaped the Grey Cloud while docked near Tallahassee and walked 400 miles southward to rejoin her people at Lake Okeechobee, where she lived until her death in 1921; and Seminole leader Thlocklo Tustenuggee (Tiger Tail), who committed suicide by swallowing crushed glass rather than remain in captivity.  It is also said ten Seminole warriors detained at Egmont marched silently into the Gulf instead of suffering relocation. Many other Seminoles died while interned on the island, but names and burial locations were not accurately recorded by the federal government. Over the last century, Egmont Key has lost more than half its land mass – and with it its important history – as the seas surrounding the island have risen at least 8 inches. State officials predict another 9- to 24-inch rise by 2060, while wakes churned by fuel tankers, container ships, and cruise liners in Tampa Bay increasingly erode the island’s dunes.




Egmont Key, Florida, from the series Where You Come From is Gone, 2017–
Archival pigment print from wet-plate collodion tintype, 40x50”
Collaboration with Cary Norton
Near this site, south of present-day St. Petersburg, a Tocobaga charnel house and burial mound were once situated on a series of 15 islands. Scholars believe the dead would be laid in the charnel house and a shaman/priest – with help from scavenging birds – would remove the flesh from the skeleton in preparation for burial.  Once stripped or picked cleaned, the bones and the eternal spirit they held were placed in the mound. The Tocobaga disappeared from the historical record by the early 1700s, as disease brought by European explorers decimated the Safety Harbor culture, leaving the Tampa Bay area virtually uninhabited for more than a century. The landscape of Tierra Verde was completely transformed in the late 1950s when the burial grounds were razed and used as fill dirt for a residential development and golf course.




Weedon Island, Pinellas County, Florida, from the series Where You Come From is Gone, 2017–
Archival pigment print from wet-plate collodion tintype, 40x50”
Collaboration with Cary Norton
Spanning approximately 3,700 acres, Weedon Island is located on the shores of Old Tampa Bay and is Florida’s largest estuary. The Weedon coastal system is comprised of a variety of aquatic and upland ecosystems, and has been occupied by human populations since the Middle Archaic period (5000-3000 BCE). The island was once home to the Yat Kitischee people of the late Weeden Island Culture [alternative spelling], who along with the nearby Safety Harbor Culture formed the major centers of political, ceremonial and social significance on the Pinellas Peninsula around 200-1000 CE. The Weeden Island Culture is known for its sophisticated ceremonial and utilitarian pottery, mound complexes, and dugout canoes. Today, much of the estuary is managed under preservation efforts, but legacy effects of mosquito ditching in the 1950’s have made salt marshes more vulnerable to flooding impacts from climate change.




Bessemer Mounds (VisionLand), Jefferson County, Alabama, from the series Where You Come From is Gone, 2017–
Archival pigment print from wet-plate collodion tintype, 40x50”
Collaboration with Cary Norton
The Bessemer Mounds were first occupied during the Late Woodland Period between 800-1000AD. While the mounds are approximately 400 years older than those found 75 miles southeast at the historically-preserved Moundville Archeological Park, historians believe there was a relationship between the mound builders. The mounds at Bessemer were leveled sometime in the 1900’s; a water sewage plant and VisionLand, a defunct theme park, are now located on the site.




Cahaba River, Dallas County, Alabama, from the series Where You Come From is Gone, 2017–
Archival pigment print from wet-plate collodion tintype, 40x50”
Collaboration with Cary Norton
For millennia people have been drawn to the land situated at the confluence of the Cahaba and Alabama rivers. It was first occupied by large populations of Paleoindians; then from 1000-1500 the Mississippian period brought agriculture and mound builders. A walled city with palisades greeted Spanish explorers before western disease killed thousands in the 16th and 17th centuries. The remaining native peoples coalesced into four tribal nations–Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek–but were wiped out and forced to move by greater influx of Europeans. By the 19th century the dirt from the ancient mounds at Cahawba was used to build railroad beds, and the town became the first, yet quickly failed, capital of Alabama. A few short years later buildings and homes were taken down brick by brick and used to build Selma, home to further injustice.




Garrett Cemetery, Cherokee County, Alabama, from the series Where You Come From is Gone, 2017–
Archival pigment print from wet-plate collodion tintype, 40x50”
Collaboration with Cary Norton
Outside the gates of the Garrett Cemetery is the final resting place of Pathkiller, the last full-blooded hereditary chief of the Cherokee. During the American Revolution Pathkiller allied himself with the British and fought against American troops, but by 1813 he had sided with Andrew Jackson’s militia in the Creek Wars. Just three years after Pathkiller’s death, Jackson forced the Cherokee from their ancestral homelands.




Miller Steam Plant, Jefferson County, Alabama, from the series What Has Been Will Be Again, 2020
Archival pigment print, 20x24”  
Made with the support of the Magnum Foundation and the Do Good Fund




Michael Farmer, Barbour County, Alabama, from the series What Has Been Will Be Again, 2020–
Archival pigment print, 20x24”  
Made with the support of the Magnum Foundation and the Do Good Fund




Payton, Cordova, Walker County, Alabama, from the series What Has Been Will Be Again, 2020–
Archival pigment print, 20x24”  
Made with the support of the Magnum Foundation and the Do Good Fund




SelecWhat Has Been Will Be Again, 2020
Archival pigment prints, 20x24” each
Made with the support of the Magnum Foundation and the Do Good Fund




Selections from the series What Has Been Will Be Again, 2020
Archival pigment prints, 20x24” each
Made with the support of the Magnum Foundation and the Do Good Fund  




Selections from the series Where the Train Goes Slow, 2018
Archival pigment prints, 16x24” each




Selections from Shift//, 2016
Engineering prints, 24x36” each
Crowd-sourced photographs mapping geographic space between the Birmingham Museum of Art and the BMA’s temporary SHIFT space, compiled during an April 2016 residency in collaboration with Birmingham photographers Rob Culpepper, Jenny Fine, Wes Frazer, Timothy Harstvedt, Devin Lunsford, C.W. Newell, Cary Norton, Carolyn Sherer, Orlando Thompson, and Leita Turner,


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STUDENT WORK




Documentation of the student curated exhibition, Inherited Scars: A Meditation on the Southern Gothic
Birmingham Museum of Art, April 2 – August 9, 2015
https://www.artsbma.org/exhibition/inherited-scars-a-meditation-on-the-southern-gothic/
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Photography in the South • 2015




Devin Lunsford, selections from the series Waiting for Something That’s Not Coming
Pigment prints, 6x6” each
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Photography in the South • 2015
devinlunsford.com




Iris Wu, selections from an untitled series
Silver gelatin and inkjet prints, various sizes
College of William & Mary • Catron Scholarship Mentor Program • 2020
iriswuphoto.com




Ty Harris, stills from Hymns of Youth
Video, 3 minutes
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Photography in the South • 2015




Christianna Traynor, selections from the series Marshall County
Pigment prints, 6x9” each
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Photography in the South • 2015




Aubrey Venkler, selections from the series Lines and Boundaries
Archival pigment prints, 16x20” each
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Neighborhood Studies • 2018




Evan Franklin, selections from the series 41st St N
Archival pigment prints, 12x16” each
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Neighborhood Studies • 2018




Macy J. Moon, selections from Day 5 - November 27, 2018, from the series Walking Archive
Digital images published to online archive website, https://macyjanemoon.cargo.site/Walking-Archive-About
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Neighborhood Studies • 2018




Selection of student artist books and zines accessioned into the Birmingham Museum of Art Hanson Library Artist Book Collection
https://uab.edu/news/self-published-artist-books-and-zines-made-by-uab-students-now-part-of-birmingham-museum-of-art-collection
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Camera-less • 2016




Daniel Senko, selections from the artist book, Taking Portraits
Rephotographed photobook dust jacket portraits, various sizes
Course Final Zine Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Camera-less • 2016




Jacob Lawley
Google street view screen capture typology
Mapping Assignment
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Camera-less • 2016




Devin Lunsford, selections from the series, Done Lost Too Much
Pigment prints documenting recovering methamphetamine cooks, made in collaboration with UAB Department of Criminology student Natalie Matos, 16x24” each
Course Final Project
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Special Topics: Stories from the Line – Documenting Poverty • 2015
devinlunsford.com




Cole Martin
Silver gelatin prints, 6x6” each
Self-portrait Assignment
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Experiential Photography • 2017




Destany Faye Miller
Silver gelatin prints, 6x9” each
Course Final Project, visualizing effects of opioid addiction and incarceration between the artist and her mother
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Experiential (Intro) Photography • 2017




Megan Hammonds
Toned silver gelatin prints, various sizes
Sequencing and Narrative Assignment
University of Alabama at Birmingham • Intermediate Photography • 2015




Eric Gregory Powell, selections from the series Route 1
Pigment prints, 16x20” each
BFA Thesis Project
Corcoran School of the Arts + Design, George Washington University • Studio Photojournalism Core IV Senior Thesis • 2007




Jessica Kolscielniak, selections from the series Weighted Decisions
Pigment prints, 16x24” each
BFA Thesis Project
Corcoran School of the Arts + Design, George Washington University • Studio Photojournalism Core IV Senior Thesis • 2007
jessicakoscielniak.com




Sara J. Winston, selections from the series Chronicles
C-prints, 8x8” each
Sequencing and Narrative Assignment
Corcoran School of the Arts + Design, George Washington University • Studio Fine Art Photography Core III • 2010
sarajwinston.com




Nick Popovici, Gang One (top) United We Stand (bottom left); Disease One (bottom center); At What Cost (bottom right)
Mixed media collages, 24x36” each
BFA Thesis Project
Corcoran College of Art + Design • Studio Fine Art Photography Core IV Senior Thesis • 2008




William Knipscher, installation view of The Children
Artist-made beeswax and charcoal crayon rubbing from photo-polymer plates in handmade wood frames, 48x60” each
BFA Thesis Project
Corcoran School of the Arts + Design, George Washington University • Studio Fine Art Photography Core IV Senior Thesis • 2009
williamknipscher.com


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